Episode 64: Are You There, Women? It’s Me, Internet.

Janice Rand writing

In this mailbag episode we answer listener questions on Star Trek, like “Do you actually like anything about Enterprise?” as well as on general topics like Wonder Woman and the casting of the 13th Doctor.

Download Now (right-click and save)

Hosts: Grace, Andi, Jarrah, Sue

Editor: Andi

  6 comments for “Episode 64: Are You There, Women? It’s Me, Internet.

  1. Janet
    July 30, 2017 at 2:59 pm

    Thanks for using my email! It’s interesting and disturbing that while shipper lenses give Trip a halo effect, they don’t protect T’Pol. Sure, there are people who give them equal blame for what went wrong in their relationship. But when fans pick a bad guy, it’s T’Pol. It’s almost always about what she did to him. Those thoughts don’t fall neatly among gender lines. Some of T’Pol’s harshest critics are (wait for it) women.

    As for the comment that shipper wars weren’t that bad back then, David Jerrold shared a story of two militant Spork shippers on Facebook from the fanzine days. They told a 16 year old gay boy he couldn’t write K/S stories because he didn’t understand male homosexuality (an example of womans/straightsplaining). They also trolled anyone who didn’t agree with them, which took a lot more effort back then without the Internet. As long as shipping existed, there has always been crazy people.

  2. Tim
    July 31, 2017 at 2:06 pm

    As you discuss the use of real people in holodeck episodes, I refer you to the VOY episode where Tuvok’s wife is created for shall we gently say ‘therapeutic’ purposes. In this case, to thine own self be true. Tuvok needs this or he will die, and he must imagine this character is his real wife and yet the holodeck wife will undoubtedly be treated with respect even if her purpose serves, in part, a sexual capacity.

    So my question is – when the Doctor on VOY imagines expressing his feelings to Seven, but can only do it on the holodeck – is it creepier to have a romantic relationship with a holofake of a real person than to just have a physical relationship that serves only that purpose and there is no commitment attached?

  3. meerkat
    August 3, 2017 at 7:10 pm

    Did you say Trip is the most popular character on Enterprise? But I hate him with a fiery burning passion every single second he is on-screen D:

  4. Sandy
    August 6, 2017 at 3:33 pm

    I love listening to Women at Warp podcasts and look forward to each new one. Just one complaint – I’m always brought up short by things like “Me and Grace…” Do we need a Universal Translator filter for grammar etiquette and/or subject-verb agreement? Klingons might not care, but think of Captain Picard.

  5. Big Top
    August 8, 2017 at 4:10 pm

    It occurs to me that a really interesting special topic would be the sexual ethics of the Holodeck, especially when later Voyager episodes like “Fair Haven” and “Human Error” are taken into consideration. It is made clear repeatedly than the Federation or Starfleet seem not to have rules about reproducing images of private citizens, even coworkers (recall Riker stating in “Hollow Pursuits” that there ought to be a protocol against it, though he admittedly is only saying this because he’s on the receiving end of an unflattering duplication) — the same episode and others seem to also imply that an individual is entitled to no privacy on the Holodeck, that others can stroll in at will.

    One can think of Holodeck as the ultimate evolution of safe sex, where a person might practice any kind of sexual fantasy. But then, would a desire to sleep with Mick Jagger be satisfied by someone whom you know to be a Mick Jagger lookalike — much less a realistic simulation of Mick Jagger?

    Fun fact (or at least a fact): interviewed by Jeff Greenwald for the book Future Perfect, Brannon Braga describes his Holodeck fantasy using a 50 foot tall woman to practice his gynaecology fetish on a huge scale.

  6. Jackie
    August 13, 2017 at 8:01 pm

    Hey! Long time listener, first time commenter. One thing I’ve noticed in the shift in shipping and fan behavior is that there’s now a sense that fans can “force” or “convince” the showrunners to make their crack ships canon. I’ve seen numerous petitions and tag campaigns to try and make them happen. I think this has been part of the rise in ship wars.
    But i also think it has to do with how easy it is to interact with one another. We can reply to meta and theories so much easier and the disagreements grow.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *